Tom Ingoldsby, Director, is the father of a disabled son and has been involved in programs supporting the mentally retarded for many years. Tom manages the camp but during the summer is as likely to be found on the beach with the campers or having a meal at one of the houses as at his desk in the camp office. As a student, he was a counselor at the Kennedy Institute summer camp for the mentally retarded.

Tom has coached Special Olympics soccer and basketball teams for over ten years. His team started as five youths who for various reasons were unable to be accommodated on an existing team and has grown to eighteen athletes making up two teams each season. Like Camp Atlantic, the priorities on Tom's teams are age appropriate behavior on and off the field, maximizing individual potential and then winning. The athletes have a broad range of athletic ability and social development. Through their interaction on the field and in team sponsored events, they have become a group of friends who interact with each other and who enjoy each other's company. The group dynamics of the Special Olympics teams are very similar to the sense of belonging and friendship that Camp Atlantic generates.

Tom is also a lawyer. He is a graduate of Brown University and Duke University Law School.

Laura Ingoldsby, Assistant Director, is a middle school teacher and coach. Laura has taught in the inner city and at a private school in Virginia. Her experience in teaching these different student groups has made Laura exceptionally well prepared to understand and effectively deal with the range of behaviors exhibited by the campers. Laura develops the activity program for the entire camp and manages the youth program.

Laura is a graduate of Washington & Lee University where she was a varsity swimmer for four years. After college she coached a women's Special Olympics soccer team. During the winter Laura is pursuing a Master's Degree in Education at Harvard University.

Group leaders live with the campers in the beach houses and are their companions in their daily activities. The group leaders are instrumental in creating the "house spirit" and organize most of the events that occur within the house such as game nights and special desserts. They also create the structure necessary for the house to function effectively and assign and monitor household chores.

Prior to the start of each season, the group leaders receive 40 hours of training including a First Aid course. Most of the group leaders have been working with persons with disabilities or are studying for careers in education, medical rehabilitation or social support services.